Hundreds March In Opposition Of Keystone XL Pipeline

People from all walks of life came out to Ft. Pierre for different reasons, but to protest the keystone pipeline.

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Taminkea Ricu, who rode for days with her tribe to the John C. Waldron Memorial Bridge, wore a small canteen around her neck, filled with water from the Cheyenne River – a river that could see pipes.

“It’s just those people who are greedy for money they’re not really worried about our real problems,” she says, “economic-wise, they’re just worried about getting that money. That is what is on their mind.”

People from all walks of life came out to Ft. Pierre for different reasons, but to protest the keystone pipeline.

Protestors held signs and prayed for a decision this week to be most favorable for them. The construction of the pipeline would mean more jobs and would fund counties looking to make improvements to infrastructure.

But the people here marching aren’t buying it. 

Jacqueline Crisman understands the importance of jobs, here in America, but is still weary.

“I just want to say that I think a lot of the information they’re getting is just not accurate,” says Crisman.

They are the same concerns among people now as they were five years ago.

Pollution, greed and preservation of heritage are all reasons why, the opposition believe, the Keystone XL Pipeline should not be built.

Today, those against, it made their presence known.

“It is very honoring because we are all fighting for this reason the sacred water that needs to be saved. Because if doesn’t be saved then we are all doomed,” added Ricu.

The march was tiring, but it was a clear way to show that the keystone pipeline is not for South Dakota.