BOGOTA, Colombia -

Doctors at several hospitals are working to stabilize the six survivors of a plane crash that killed 75 people near Medellin, Colombia. All the injured suffered severe trauma injuries.

Hospital officials say Chapecoense player Alan Ruschel appears to be in the most delicate condition. He's suffered a spinal fracture. Ruschel was stabilized at the San Juan de Dios hospital and transferred by ambulance to the intensive care unit of better-equipped facility, where he's awaiting surgery.

San Juan de Dios medical director Guillermo Leon says defender Helio Zampier arrived shortly after dawn and is in stable condition with skull and chest injuries.

A third player, Jakson Follmann, is at another facility and being evaluated for multiple unspecified injuries.

Journalist Rafael Valmorbida is recovering from surgery for chest injuries.
Bolivian crew members Ximena Suarez and Erwin Tumiri are listed in stable condition and recovering.
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11:05 a.m.
The plane carrying a Brazilian soccer team that crashed in Colombia was also transporting many journalists covering the team.

Colombian aviation authorities say 21 journalists were among the 81 passengers. Only one of the journalists is listed as surviving.

The journalists came from several organizations, including Fox and Globo, a large Brazilian conglomerate, and a handful of FM and AM radio stations in South America.

The plane carrying the Chapecoense team departed from Santa Cruz, Bolivia, and crashed before arriving in Medillin on Monday.
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8:40 a.m.
Colombia's civil aviation agency now says at least six people have survived the plane crash that killed more than 70 people, including many members of a Brazilian soccer team.

The agency statement says at least three Chapecoence players, two plane crew members and one journalist survived Monday's crash near the city of Medellin.
Reports about the number of survivors have varied overnight because of confusion amid the emergency.
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8:20 a.m.
An injury sidelined Chapecoence soccer player Alejandro Martinuccio. It also likely saved his life.

The Argentine forward wasn't able to play in the scheduled match in Colombia, so he wasn't on the team plane that crashed Monday night in Colombia, killing most of those aboard. He told Argentina's La Red radio that "I was saved because I got injured."

"I feel profound sadness," he said. "The only thing I can ask is prayers for the companions who were on the flight."

The 28-year-old has played for Spain's Villarreal, Penarol of Uruguay and Brazilian clubs Coritiba, Ponte Preta, Cruzeiro and Fluminense.
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7:45 a.m.
Barcelona and Real Madrid have held a minute of silence before their practice sessions in honor of the victims of the plane crash involving Brazilian club Chapecoense.

Real Madrid also released a statement expressing its "condolences to relatives and friends of the victims" and "wishing an early recovery for the survivors."

Atletico Madrid used Twitter to send its condolences to the victims' relatives. One of Chapecoense's players on the plane was midfielder Cleber Santana, who played for Atletico from 2007-10.
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7:25 a.m.
A spokesman for Brazilian soccer club Chapecoense has confirmed the death of goalkeeper Danilo who had initially been rescued alive from a plane crash in Colombia and was being treated at a hospital.

Team spokesman Andrei Copetti announced the death to The Associated Press. Another goalkeeper was reported to be among several survivors.

Chapecoense was traveling on a chartered flight to play Colombian club Atletico Nacional in the Copa Sudamericana final when the plane crashed near Medellin.
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7:10 a.m.
FIFA President Gianni Infantino says it is a "very, very sad day for football" after a plane carrying members of a Brazilian soccer team crashed in Colombia.

Chapecoense was traveling on a chartered plane to play Colombian club Atletico Nacional in the Copa Sudamericana final. Police in Colombia said there were some survivors among the 81 passengers.

In a statement, Infantino says "we are so sorry to hear about the airplane crash in Colombia, it is shocking and tragic news. At this difficult time our thoughts are with the victims, their families and friends."
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6:55 a.m.
Bolivian authorities say that the plane carrying a Brazilian first division soccer team that took off from Santa Cruz before crashing in Colombia was owned by a Venezuelan company.

Cesar Torrico, a spokesman for Bolivia's civil aviation agency, said the aircraft had arrived earlier in the day from the city of Cochabamba and picked up the Brazilian team at Santa Cruz's Viru Viru airport. Torrico said that the plane underwent an inspection before departing for Colombia and reported no problems.

He said that the LaMia airline hails from the Venezuelan city of Merida but later re-established itself in Santa Cruz. He said the airline had been used in the past to shuttle several Bolivian teams as well as Medellin's Atletico Nacional for matches around South America.

Brazilian aviation authorities said they had denied LaMia's request for a charter flight directly from Sao Paulo, saying only a Brazilian or Colombian company was allowed to operate the requested route.
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6:20 a.m.
Brazil's president says that authorities are mobilizing to help the team and families of victims in the plane crash in Colombia that killed members of a Brazilian first division soccer team.

In a series of tweets Tuesday morning, Michel Temer says officials from the foreign ministry and aviation officials have been called to help.

He said that "the government will do everything possible to alleviate the pain" of family members of the players and journalists who died in the crash.

A chartered aircraft with 81 people on board, including the Chapecoense soccer team which was heading to Colombia for a regional tournament final, crashed on its way to Medellin's international airport.
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5:30 a.m.
The head of Colombia's civil aviation agency says that authorities aren't ruling out the possibility the chartered flight carrying a Brazilian soccer team ran out of fuel before crashing. But for now, the main line of investigation is a possible electrical failure aboard the aircraft.

Alfredo Bocanegra, speaking from the rescue command center, said that communication with Bolivian aviation officials suggested the plane was experiencing electrical problems.