SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -

The Associated Press has reported that Amendment V, a measure supporting non-partisan elections has been rejected.

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Voters have rejected a measure backed by the short-term lending industry to amend the state constitution to allow unlimited interest rates on loans.
    
Constitutional Amendment U failed on Tuesday. It would have capped payday loan interest rates at 18 percent annually but allowed higher ones if the borrower agreed in writing.
    
Opponents argued that the measure was a deceptive attempt to confuse voters casting their ballots. Supporters unsuccessfully argued that they wanted to end high-interest-rate loans while defending free-market principles.

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Republican Chris Nelson says he is "absolutely humbled" by the support shown by voters who have given him another term on the state's Public Utilities Commission.
    
Nelson triumphed Tuesday over Oglala Sioux green energy entrepreneur Henry Red Cloud, a Democrat.
    
Nelson says his top priority during his next term will be to expand broadband internet access in rural areas. He says there are areas in South Dakota that have "world-class internet access, but you can literally go across the gravel road and the neighbor will have no access whatsoever."
    
He says he will also try to keep utility rates as low as possible.
    
Red Cloud was a first-time candidate running on a green energy platform. He did not immediately return a call from The Associated Press seeking comment on the election's outcome.
    
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10:45 p.m.
    
South Dakota businesses that hire teenagers after Election Day will have to keep paying them the state's current minimum wage.
    
Voters on Tuesday rejected Referred Law 20, which would have established a youth minimum wage of $7.50 an hour for workers under 18.
    
Foes successfully argued that the law is discriminatory and an affront to voters who overwhelmingly in 2014 passed a hike to the minimum wage, which now sits at $8.55 an hour.
    
Supporters argued it would help young people get their first jobs. Because activists sent the law to the voters, it didn't go into effect as intended in 2015.
    
Two years ago, voters raised the minimum hourly wage from $7.25 to $8.50 and tied future increases to the cost of living.
    
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10:25 p.m.
    
Voters have approved a ballot measure capping payday loan interest rates at 36 percent annually in South Dakota.
    
Initiated Measure 21 passed on Tuesday. Ballot measure supporters say people have options for help other than what they contend is a snare designed to profit off the poor.
    
Lending companies argue that they provide consumers with important access to short-term credit. They say the measure will put their industry out of business in South Dakota.
    
That's how a recent rate cap initiative played out in Montana. State figures show regulated short-term lenders plummeted from over 100 to none within several years of its 2010 approval.
    
A 2014 Pew Charitable Trusts report found the average annual percentage rate charged for a payday loan in South Dakota was 574 percent.
    
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10:20 p.m.
    
Republican Chris Nelson has won another term on the state Public Utilities Commission.
    
Nelson triumphed Tuesday over Oglala Sioux green energy entrepreneur Henry Red Cloud, a Democrat.
    
Nelson is a former secretary of state who has served on the three-member commission since 2011.
    
He campaigned on keeping electricity rates low and expanding broadband internet access in rural areas.
    
Nelson said during the race that he has a record of making decisions without a political agenda or personal whims.
    
Red Cloud was a first-time candidate running on a green energy platform. He had hoped the vigor focused on defeating the Dakota Access pipeline would help him win his longshot bid for election to the commission, which regulates pipelines.
    
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9:55 p.m.
    
U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem says she's looking forward to working on the next farm bill and focusing on growth and improving wages when she returns to Congress for a fourth term.
    
The Republican lawmaker triumphed Tuesday over her Democratic challenger, state Rep. Paula Hawks. Noem says South Dakota needs someone who will fight aggressively for the state in Washington.
    
Noem says South Dakota residents are facing challenges including taxes and high health costs. She says she's humbled to represent the state for another two years.
    
Hawks says the Democratic Party has soul-searching to do about what needs to happen for it to be successful in South Dakota.
    
Noem was first elected in 2010 when she beat incumbent Democrat Stephanie Herseth Sandlin.
    
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9:47 p.m.
    
South Dakota voters have rejected a labor-backed ballot measure that would have allowed unions to charge fees to nonmembers.
    
Voters came out against Initiated Measure 23 on Tuesday. The measure would have given corporate or nonprofit organizations the right to charge fees for services provided.
    
Opponents successfully argued the plan was designed to force people who choose not to belong to unions to pay them fees anyway.
    
Measure supporters contended it would have fixed unfairness in state law by requiring that nonmembers pay for services that benefit them. They said it would have allowed a union that has a collective bargaining agreement with an employer to charge fees to non-union members covered under that contract for services such as representation during the grievance process.
    
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9:30 p.m.
    
A ballot measure that would establish constitutional rights for crime victims appears to have strong support from South Dakota voters with about a third of the votes counted.
    
Among several provisions, Constitutional Amendment S would give crime victims the right to be notified of the escape or release of the accused and the opportunity to offer input throughout the case.
    
Supporters say the measure elevates victims' rights to ensure they have protections similar to criminal defendants.
    
Opponents argue it would bog down the system for victims while increasing court-related costs. They say many rights included in the amendment are already in law.
    
The same measure is also on the ballot in North Dakota, where it appears to be favored by voters with about half of the votes counted.
    
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9:20 p.m.
    
South Dakota ballot measures are falling short in early returns except for measures on technical institutes, victims' rights and payday loan interest rates.
    
The early returns Tuesday don't look promising for seven measures on the ballot, including a trio of initiatives that could radically reshape South Dakota politics.
    
But a proposal that would incorporate crime victims' rights into the state constitution and an initiative that would cap short-term loan interest rates at 36 percent annually are faring well.
    
Also leading is a constitutional amendment that would make it clear that South Dakota's four technical institutes are independent from the Board of Regents.
    
There are 10 measures on the South Dakota ballot this year.
    
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8:50 p.m.
    
In victory, U.S. Sen. John Thune says no matter which party holds the Senate in January, there's a lot of hard work ahead.
    
South Dakota voters delivered Thune a win Tuesday over his Democratic challenger, Jay Williams, a Yankton businessman. Thune says he has always put South Dakota's interests first and that commitment won't change.
    
Thune praised the accomplishments of the GOP-led U.S. Senate, where he serves as the third ranking Republican. During the campaign, Thune touted himself as a leader who is making headway for South Dakota despite partisan gridlock in Washington.
    
Williams says he's disappointed. But he says that Thune needed someone to challenge him.
    
Thune narrowly defeated Democratic leader Tom Daschle in 2004 to take the seat and didn't face an opponent in 2010.
    
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8:20 p.m.
    
Republican U.S. Sen. John Thune will return to Washington for a third term in the Senate.
    
South Dakota's senior senator won re-election Tuesday over Yankton businessman Jay Williams, a Democrat.
    
The third-ranking Republican, Thune has served as chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.
    
Thune had a staggering cash advantage over Williams during the race. He touted himself as a leader who is making headway for South Dakota despite partisan gridlock in Washington.
    
Williams argued that he's nonpolitical and could go to Washington to reach across the aisle.
    
Thune narrowly defeated Democratic leader Tom Daschle in 2004 to take the seat and didn't face an opponent in 2010.
    
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8:15 p.m.
    
GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump has won heavily Republican South Dakota.
    
The New York billionaire claimed the state's three electoral votes Tuesday in his contest against Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.
    
Trump was the heavy favorite to win South Dakota, which hasn't supported a Democrat since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964.
    
He didn't hold rallies in South Dakota over the course of the campaign, which drew former first daughter Chelsea Clinton to the state in support of Hillary Clinton.
    
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5:00 p.m.
    
There will be a 15-minute delay in reporting results from South Dakota after one polling place had to close for that amount of time Tuesday when a fire alarm sounded.
    
The alarm sounded at South Middle School in Rapid City.
    
Secretary of State Shantel Krebs says that poll workers moved voters outside for exactly 15 minutes, so that location will remain open an extra 15 minutes.
    
All vote results for the state will be held until all the polls close - tonight, that'll be at 8:15 p.m., Central time. The affected location is in the Mountain time zone.
    
Julie Pearson is the Pennington County auditor. She says workers protected the vote and grabbed the ballots in the box and the master registration list as they ushered voters outside.
    
Pearson said workers were told that a student pulled the fire alarm. The Rapid City Fire Department tweeted that the alarm was reset as quickly as possible to allow voting to resume.
    
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3:30 p.m.
    
Voters in Minnehaha County arrived at the polls to find signs that told them they were barred from using cellphones.
    
But there is no state law in South Dakota that prohibits cellphones at polling places.
    
Libby Skarin is policy director for the American Civil Liberties Union. Skarin told the Argus Leader that the ACLU believes voters should be allowed to bring cellphones inside to access information they might need to vote.
    
County Auditor Bob Litz told the newspaper that voters should look up information before they get to the polls. He wonders how officials would prevent people from taking pictures of other ballots, and said he just doesn't want cellphones inside, "so that's that."
    
Litz did not immediately return a phone message left by The Associated Press.
    
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11:55 a.m.
    
Roughly a fifth of South Dakota voters have already cast a ballot.
    
Data from the Secretary of State's office shows that more than 108,000 South Dakota voters have returned their absentee ballot. The state has more than 544,000 active voters this election.
    
Polls across South Dakota opened at 7 a.m. Tuesday and will close at 7 p.m. local time. In Sioux Falls, polling sites have seen a steady stream of voters.
    
Judy Harig is among the more than 300 people who have cast a ballot Tuesday at an elementary school in Sioux Falls. The 69-year-old Harig says she voted for Donald Trump because she wants "more orderly and humane" immigration laws.
    
Harig says Trump, unlike Hillary Clinton, will appoint U.S. Supreme Court justices who "would abide by the constitution."
    
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8:50 a.m.
    
The Secretary of State's office says all polling sites across South Dakota are now open.
    
Polls in Sioux Falls have seen a steady stream of voters Tuesday morning.
    
Some voters in Minnehaha County tried to beat the Election Day lines by voting early Monday. Sioux Falls resident Jon Drew was among the 70 people who at one point during Monday's lunch time were in line waiting to vote at the administration building in Minnehaha County.
    
The 37-year-old Drew says it was great to see a female name on the ballot for president, but his decision to vote for Hillary Clinton had nothing to do with her gender. He says he hopes people will be able to find some common ground after this bitter election, but he won't hold his breath.
    
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7:35 a.m.
    
Election Day voting is getting underway in South Dakota with polls already open in the eastern half of the state.
    
Polls are open Tuesday from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m.
    
The weather shouldn't be a problem for voters heading to the polls. The National Weather Service forecast calls for temperatures in the 50s and 60s across the state with sunny skies and light wind.
    
Voters can use the Secretary of State's Vote605 app to view a sample ballot and find their polling location from their phones. The app also gives people the ability to figure out where they are registered to vote.
    
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12:22 a.m.
    
South Dakota voters are expected to give the state's three electoral votes to GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump and re-elect U.S. Sen. John Thune and Rep. Kristi Noem.
    
The main suspense of election day on Tuesday is likely to be the fate of no fewer than 10 ballot questions on topics ranging from public funding for campaigns to payday loan interest rates.
    
The last time a Democratic presidential candidate carried South Dakota was Lyndon Johnson in 1964, which doesn't bode well for Hillary Clinton.
    
At the state level, Republican lawmakers can be confident they'll head to Pierre next year still firmly in control of the state House and Senate.