WASHINGTON -

President-elect Donald Trump faces steep legal and legislative hurdles if he wants to reinstate waterboarding. That's the interrogation practice that simulates drowning.

Under a law approved last year, all government employees, including intelligence agents, must abide by Army guidelines for interrogating prisoners. Those guidelines that don't permit waterboarding. If the Trump administration tries to change the law or the guidelines, he will run into bipartisan opposition in Congress.

Waterboarding and other harsh methods were used after 9/11 to try to obtain useful information from terrorist suspects.

Many intelligence, military and law enforcement officials say, however, that the practice is ineffective, immoral and gives the U.S. a black eye.

Trump insists it works and says he will use waterboarding and "a lot more" on Islamic extremists.