SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -

Despite the fact that Hillary Clinton couldn't break the highest glass ceiling and win the presidency, she was the first woman to ever receive a a major party nomination in the race. There are plenty of other women who won big as result of the 2016 election.  

Local women's advocate Amy Scott-Stoltz said, "Women are finding their voice in lot of different arenas, in lots of different ways."

Especially in the political arena. In November, many made history. ,Catherine Cortez-Masto from Nevada just became the first ever Latina to be elected to the U.S. Senate. Illinois just elected Tammy Duck-worth, the second Asian-American to ever win a Senate seat and the first to see combat. But many are talking about the woman behind Donald Trump; not his wife, but his campaign manager. Kellyanne Conway is the first woman to ever run a successful presidential campaign.

Scott-Stoltz said, "We haven't necessarily looked at the roles behind the scenes that women have in politics and they don't have to run for office in order to be influential."

Scott-Stoltz says while some are disappointed that a woman hasn't yet won the presidency, they're using it as motivation.  

"Women are saying what can I do, how can I get more involved in my community, in my elections and so forth, so I see a lot of women stepping up and deciding they want to take (on) a bigger role," said Scott-Stoltz.

She says it's also inspiring younger generations, which tells her that a woman in the white house, with the title of President, isn't too far out of reach.

"A woman was talking to her very young daughter about the election saying that she was bummed that the first woman wasn't elected president and the daughter said, 'well then, maybe then I can be the first woman President'," said Scott-Stoltz.

While women have made huge strides, there is still more work to do. Right now, before new candidates take office, women make up just 19 percent of the U.S. Congress. Of the 535 members, 104 are women.