President Obama Criticizes Supreme Court Immigration Ruling

UPDATE: President Barack Obama is using the deadlocked Supreme Court opinion on his immigration actions to hammer Republicans for refusing to confirm his nominee to the Supreme Court.
    
Obama says Republicans are allowing partisan politics to jeopardize critical issues. He says, “America should not let it stand.”
    
The president says his immigration actions can’t go forward until the court has a ninth justice to break the tie.
    
Obama is also alluding to Republican Donald Trump’s call for building a border wall with Mexico. Obama says the U.S. doesn’t need to wall itself off and that immigration isn’t something to fear.

12 p.m.:

President Barack Obama says the Supreme Court decision blocking his immigration plan sets the system back and “takes us further from the country we aspire to be.”
    
Obama says America has been a refuge for the world for more than two centuries. He says it’s a diverse and inclusive nation because it’s a nation of immigrants.
    
Obama sought to use his own authority to shield from deportation millions of immigrants living illegally in the country.
    
The high court, which tied 4-4, effectively kills Obama’s plan for the duration of his presidency.
    
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11:30 a.m.
    
President Barack Obama will speak from the White House at midday Thursday about the Supreme Court vote on his immigration plan.
    
The White House says Obama will deliver a statement at 11:45 a.m. EDT from the Brady Press Briefing Room. The statement was hastily arranged and comes just before Obama departs Washington for a trip to the West Coast.
    
The high court’s tie vote effectively kills Obama’s plan for the duration of his presidency.
    
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10:40 a.m.
    
A tie vote by the Supreme Court is blocking President Barack Obama’s immigration plan that sought to shield millions living in the U.S. illegally from deportation.
    
The justices’ one-sentence opinion on Thursday effectively kills the plan for the rest of Obama’s presidency.
    
A tie vote sets no national precedent but leaves in place the ruling by the lower court. In this case, the federal appeals court in New Orleans said the Obama administration lacked the authority to shield up to 4 million immigrants from deportation and make them eligible for work permits without approval from Congress.
    
Texas led 26 Republican-dominated states in challenging the program Obama announced in November 2014. Congressional Republicans also backed the states’ lawsuit.

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